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25 Nov 2019

A Little White Lie Moves from the Stage to the Screen Featured

What happens when you tell a little white lie and it snowballs into a cascade of unraveled secrets? That’s the leitmotif of the first film produced by Crossfield House Productions -- “A Little White Lie” – which will have its world premiere in Toronto on November 29 at the Regent Theatre.

Their play of the same name opened in Toronto two years ago.

The film revolves around successful tech CEO, Michael Myers (Troy Crossfield), who goes on a journey of self-discovery when he finds out that he is about to lose his mother to cancer. Michael thought that he had put his childhood traumas to rest but his inner battles surface when his past and current realities meet.

When his mother reveals that her dying wish is for her son to find true love and meet his girlfriend, Michael calls on the help of his employee, Stacey White (Sheronna Osbourne), to help him convince his mother that he is happy and on the road to marriage, despite his struggles with his identity.

During the visit, a dark secret comes out, forcing Michael to realize his lies are becoming too much to handle. With multiple lives and careers at stake, he is at risk of losing it all.

Michael has to make a choice: tell the truth and be free, or keep paying for the lies.

The cinematography of “A Little White Lie” is vivid and builds a desire to want to see what happens next and to follow the pace of the sequence of the film which moves quickly. It is approximately 48 minutes long.

Written by Crossfield, Osbourne and Tazia Harris, and directed by Chris Chin, also known as Christian Miller, the film introduces us at the outset to how the ‘Little White Lie’ app that Michael and Victor (Robert Ball) created is used to get out of a failed booty call.

Soon we meet the men behind the app and are also introduced to the conniving nature of Victor. This later informs the uncertainty and questioning that Michael has of his identity.

Using the technique of flashback and a bit of comedy in the opening scene, the film gives us a window into what motivates the main characters and others to apply a little white lie to their situations and the circumstances.

From Victor’s deception early in the film to Michael’s declaration to Stacey that, “That’s the problem I’m not into women,” to what we, as viewers, and Stacey discover at the same time, it beckons us to try to understand the complicated relationship that Michael has with his family. We find out in the denouement why this is so and are left feeling empathy but also wondering when the film ends – what’s his next move?

“A Little White Lie” explores lies, love, childhood sexual abuse, mortality, and the preservation of self – all themes that are complemented by original songs written by Crossfield, Glenn Lewis and the autobotz. 

The photography directed by Jerome Lightbody is sharp and costume designer Sheronna Osbourne’s choices are vibrant. All of these elements make this film one you must see when it opens in the theatre.

This film is rated 4B's out of 5. Photo credit: Jerome Lightbody features Troy Crossfield in A Little White Lie.

Know a Black Canadian film we should cover? Email us: info at byblacks.com.

Neil Armstrong is a Toronto-based journalist who freelances with the Jamaican Weekly Gleaner and formerly with Pride News Magazine, and Caribbean Headline News on Rogers TV. Previously, he worked at Radio Jamaica Ltd.(RJR), CHRY 105.5 FM (now VIBE FM) and CJRT FM (now Jazz FM).

Read 78 times Last modified on Tuesday, 26 November 2019 20:58
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