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Walker Law Professional Corporation

Walker Law Professional Corporation

At the outset of the pandemic, the Court ordered a ban on the enforcement of residential evictions tribunal orders. This ban ended on July 31, 2020 and evictions are now enforceable as of August 4, 2020.

Many tenants and landlords alike have become increasingly concerned about the changes that the Government of Ontario is proposing to make to the Residential Tenancies Act (“RTA”).

Under the Residential Tenancies Act (“RTA”), landlords may only evict tenants for certain reasons. However, in a hot rental market, landlords may falsify reasons to evict a tenant, so that the unit may be renovated and re-rented at a much higher price. This is known as a “renoviction”.

On Monday, May 4 at 12:01 a.m., the Ontario government reopened a large portion of the construction industry. However, in order to resume construction, contractors must comply with strict public health measures and operate safely during the COVID-19 outbreak. This article takes a look at how your residential construction project may be impacted going forward.

A concerning impact of COVID-19 is the impact on child access arrangements. Naturally, parents have their children’s best interests in mind, and this extends to minimizing the possibility that children will be exposed to the COVID-19 virus. In a nuclear family, ensuring minimal contact with the virus would require keeping children at home. But this solution is more complicated for families where biological parents are living apart.

The COVID-19 Pandemic has unleashed havoc in many industries as a result of forced business closures and social distancing orders. The government and court have provided some guidance on how COVID-19 will impact residential leases, but still, there has been a lot of uncertainty for residential landlords and tenants. This article will focus on why it is important for residential landlords and tenants to work out if necessary, payment or deferral of rent.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, the economy has been struggling to maintain the balance between continued delivery of essential services and the need to promote physical distancing. Ontario’s court system has been trying to balance public health concerns with the need to continue promoting access to justice.

Since the beginning of 2020, the world has been concerned about the Novel Coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a group of viruses that can cause influenza-like symptoms in humans. An interesting characteristic of Coronaviruses is that they are “zoonotic”, meaning they can be transferred between humans and animals.

Much like the reception that greeted ride-sharing apps like Uber and Lyft when they first entered Toronto’s marketplace, there has been a great deal of controversy surrounding the short-term housing rental economy ever since apps like Airbnb gained popularity in the city.

In our December post, we provided information on laws that you may see in 2020. As we celebrate our 10th year, we're detailing the ten laws that already have or will definitely change this year. Federal Tax Changes The basic amount that most Canadians can earn tax- free increased on January 1 to $13,229 from $12,298, which may result in tax savings of up to $140 in 2020. Changes to the Divorce Act The majority of changes will be effective July 1, 2020. The changes include updated criteria to determine a child’s best interests in custody cases and measures to address family violence when making parenting arrangements. Amendment to the Canada Business Act to include DiversityPublic corporations incorporated under this Act are required to report diversity of directors and senior management, which includes visible minorities. Virtual Currency Dealers Must Register with the Federal Government: By June 1, 2020, they must meet the same client identification, record keeping, and reporting requirements as banks and credit unions. Amendments to Comparison Countries Regarding Drug PricingBy July 1, 2020, Canada will remove countries such as the United States and Switzerland for comparing and determining drug pricing and will add countries with similar populations such as Spain and Australia. Ontario Wide No more out of country health insuranceThose who become ill while travelling cannot claim the $400 a day maximum covering of emergency care or the $50 a day maximum for emergency outpatient services such as an MRI. Restrictions on vaping productsConvenience stores and gas stations are banned from promoting vaping products. Cancel Increase in Minimum WageBy October 1, 2020, Ontario’s $14 minimum wage will be adjusted to the rate of inflation, but will not increase to the predetermined $15. Dogs on Restaurant PatiosRestaurants and bars are permitted to allow dogs on patios where low-risk foods…

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